Lustrum: (Cicero Trilogy 2)

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In stock online Usually dispatched within 24 hours. Quantity Add to basket. This item has been added to your basket View basket Checkout. Your local Waterstones may have stock of this item. View other formats and editions. Synopsis Author. Rome, 63 BC. In a city on the brink of acquiring a vast empire, seven men are struggling for power. Cicero is consul, Caesar his ruthless young rival, Pompey the republic's greatest general, Crassus its richest man, Cato a political fanatic, Catilina a psychopath, Clodius an ambitious playboy.

The stories of these real historical figures - their alliances and betrayals, their cruelties and seductions, their brilliance and their crimes - are all interleaved to form this epic novel. Its narrator is Tiro, a slave who serves as confidential secretary to the wily, humane, complex Cicero. He knows all his master's secrets - a dangerous position to be in. From the discovery of a child's mutilated body, through judicial execution and a scandalous trial, to the brutal unleashing of the Roman mob, Lustrum is a study in the timeless enticements and horrors of power.

With Lustrum, [he] has surpassed himself. Visit the Robert Harris author page. Added to basket. The Second Sleep. Robert Harris. Paris Echo. Sebastian Faulks. Before the Coffee Gets Cold. Toshikazu Kawaguchi. Normal People. Sally Rooney. A Keeper. Graham Norton. From the discovery of a child's mutilated body, through judicial execution and a scandalous trial, to the brutal unleashing of the Roman mob, Lustrum is a study in the timeless enticements and horrors of power.

With Lustrum , [he] has surpassed himself. It is one of the most exciting thrillers I have ever read". Help Centre. Track My Order. My Wishlist Sign In Join. Be the first to write a review. Share This eBook:.


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Add to Wishlist. Instant Download. Jan 01, Thom rated it liked it Shelves: fiction-series. The first volume Imperium: A Novel of Ancient Rome dealt with the rise of a hungry Cicero, whose wit and legal tactics impelled him to the office of Consul. This novel deals with the aftermath - death threats and a conspiracy while in office, the rise of Caesar and the founding of the Triumvirate.

This Cicero has his power nibbled away and rests on his laurels for a bit too long while the Roman Republic crumbles around him. The story ends with the flight into exile. The first two volumes make u The first volume Imperium: A Novel of Ancient Rome dealt with the rise of a hungry Cicero, whose wit and legal tactics impelled him to the office of Consul. The first two volumes make up Cicero's early career, though I would have liked a few more speeches.

While the writing is still good, the story drags a bit in the second half, and I had to fight to stay interested. There is a third volume that arrived last year Dictator which probably delves into the mid career. With all the material there, I may wait to see if a fourth book is planned and read them together. Lustrum shows a master writer at work. The second book in a trilogy, it clearly establishes Robert Harris as one of the two great pillars of Roman historical fiction writing.

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We also see Caesar as mercilessly ambitious. Overall simply a brilliant read, as Robert Harris brings to life the poisonous patriarchy of the Roman Republic with an ease that feels effortless. I have already started reading the final novel in the Cicero trilogy! While Lustrum stands alone, I would recommend starting at the beginning with Imperium. In the course of Lustrum, Rome is ruled by an egotistical, populist demagogue who gains power by exploiting the ignorance and prejudice of the mob. Cicero's brand of measured reasonable politics falls out of fashion!!! How times change!! Narrated by Cicero's faithful secretary, Tiro, we see how even the high-minded I have already started reading the final novel in the Cicero trilogy!

Narrated by Cicero's faithful secretary, Tiro, we see how even the high-minded can be compromised by the daily necessity of political life!! Julius Caesar's rise to absolute power seems inevitable as Book 3, Dictator, gets under way. A clue in the title? But we know our Shakespeare!!!! Cui bono? He catches the atmosphere, machinations and tone of politics in the late Roman Republic to perfection. Better still, his portrayal of Cicero is among the most convincing I have read.

Here is no boring wordsmith, no cowardly or hypocritical makeweight, no self-promoting charlatan. Cicero, in these novels, is a hugely talented politician, lawyer and orator, who is also subject to the flaws and imperfections of any human. He is Cui bono? He is also principled, which is rather a disadvantage in the high stakes world of the disintegrating republic. Terrific stuff.

The sequel to the novel Imperium, and weirdly the story used in the play Imperium which we recently saw: it's excellent. This is the Rise and Fall of Cicero: starting with his election to Consul which he didn't mention in the book nearly as often as he did in the play.

His year in office - and it's resultant political infighting - takes the first half; the remaining four years of the Lustrum 5 years apparently is sped through in the rest, before it all starts to unravel for him. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It's that I cannot see what I could have done differently. I don't even know how to describe this series. The second novel was just as great as the first, and I'm just??

So I'll start off by saying that Cicero was as adorable as ever. I love that he remained awkwardly sweet throughout and that his faults were shown too , and I love the way that Harris writ "And do you know what most torments me as I lie awake at night? I love that he remained awkwardly sweet throughout and that his faults were shown too , and I love the way that Harris writes his interactions with Pompey, Caesar and Catiline. There's something about them that just feels so authentic and brilliant. Catilina was talking to Caesar, and when they saw Cicero arrive, red-faced from the heat and wearing armour, they both laughed heartily and began gesturing to the others to look.

The writing was beautiful as usual. I honestly think that these books are some of the most well-written books I have ever read. But all things must come to dust eventually. No human being, no system, no age is impervious to this law; everything beneath the stars will perish. The last night of the year is often a melancholy time. Janus looks backward as well as forward, and sometimes each prospect seems equally unappealing.


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  • Lustrum - (cicero Trilogy 2). - Robert Harris - Google книги!
  • It was one of those endless hot summer days when the sun seems reluctant to sink, and I remember how still it was, the motes of dust motionless in the shafts of fading light. It was one of those nights when the sky is an adventure all to itself, a brilliant moon racing through motionless oceans of silvery cloud.

    And-- again-- I love Cicero and Terentia's relationship. Although it isn't dwelt on too much, it's such a strong part of the plot, providing humour and warmth, as well as tension, and just o h my go d his relationship with his whole family is beautiful. He dabbed the corners of his mouth with his napkin and threw it on to the table, then stood and offered his hand to Terentia. She took it with a smile all the more striking because it was so rare. But for the whole of our first week in residence he did little except play with the children, taking them fishing for mackerel, and jumping the waves on the little beach beneath the low stone wall.

    And Hybrida, despite his sleaziness, was great purely for Cicero's reactions to his behaviour. As Hybrida started snoring, Cicero gave me a look of infinite revulsion and passed the remainder of the journey in silence with his arms folded, a brooding expression on his face.

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    I think that one of the greatest things about this series is that Harris takes these well-known people and turns them into so much more. Not a single character is flat, and the novel and the actual events themselves rely so heavily on their interactions between each other. The build-up to Cicero's exile was so heartbreaking, it killed me to read it. One particular passage literally had me thinking about it all day. There was a slight crack in Cicero's voice. He withdrew his hand from his pocket and raised it to his forehead.

    He looked down at the carpet. His body began to shake slightly, and I realised to my horror that he was weeping. And the final scene, wherein Cicero tells Terentia and Atticus that he has declined Caesar's offer, is excellently played out. She pulled away from him. Will you kill yourself?

    Okay, I need to stop writing because this isn't even a review; this is just a sprawl of quotes, followed by my own ramblings. Jul 03, Lemar rated it it was amazing Shelves: biography , novel , historical-fiction. Excellent sequel to Imperium which I also loved. Robert Harris employs his gift as a story teller to write history the way it should be written, as a moment to moment series of decisions, mistakes and triumphs with an uncertain future.

    Cicero emerges as the giant of history that he is for all the right reasons in these books. Harris understands that the man who does the brave thing despite his nervousness is more heroic than the man Caesar are you getting this? That Cicero built his entire career and legacy on the use of the word makes him a fitting hero to a novelist. Harris is able to capture that greatness through surviving quotes that, when uttered in the novel, resonate all the more because of how carefully he has created the man for us.

    It is said that no man is a hero to his valet. This is not true in this case as the story is rendered by Cicero's slave and secretary, Tiro. It is no easy thing to portray a man in full and have him emerge heroic yet Harris achieves that in Conspirata. I thought my job was hard until I read about the job or a Roman consul.

    Jul 23, Victor Sonkin rated it it was amazing Shelves: 21st-century , civilization , classical-studies , egypt , english-language , greece , first-person , history , british , fiction. The whole trilogy is excellent. I've often wondered why in Shakespeare's only play to feature Cicero as a character, Julius Caesar , he has a mute part, and the audience only finds out that he gave a speech in Greek, was not chosen as part of the conspiracy against Caesar, and then is proscribed dead. Strange way to represent one of history's most famous orators, one whose words and writing, according to Wikipedia, initiated the 14th century Renaissance.

    Robert Harris' second novel to delve into the his life and last sputtering I've often wondered why in Shakespeare's only play to feature Cicero as a character, Julius Caesar , he has a mute part, and the audience only finds out that he gave a speech in Greek, was not chosen as part of the conspiracy against Caesar, and then is proscribed dead.

    Robert Harris' second novel to delve into the his life and last sputtering decades of the Roman Republic does much to restore his status as a great thinker and a key player in power struggle between the Old Order and the New Men. Told from the perspective of his trusty and inventive slave Tiro, who narrates his master's political and personal relationships with humbleness and hindsight supposed to be the memoirs that Tiro actually wrote, but were lost ages ago. Before turning to Cicero, it is worthwhile to consider the freed slave living in old age during Augustus' reign, writing the memoirs of the highs and lows of his service to Cicero's family.

    Both gossipy and candid, TIro comes across as someone who could spot the signs of danger ahead for his master, but do little to turn the tide except for lending astute advice that was more often than not followed. He also drops hints at the life he'd rather be living as a free man, and it is painful to imagine him not being so near the centre of Roman history, but admittedly he would have been much happier with a farm of his own, maybe even Agathe as his wife. I still don't know if I'd be able to understand the whole Catilina catastrophe without Tiro's knowing commentary.

    Years ago, I read the speeches Cicero made regarding the conspiracy which happened during his consulship, and was a bit confused why he got so worked up over something that didn't happen. Now it is clear how much was at stake for the republic with the potential massacre, riots and the threat of Pompey's return to Rome.

    While it is easy to see how Cicero needed to do everything in his power to stop this disaster, the novel also shows how easily his actions could be reinterpreted by his numerous enemies first as paranoid overkill, and then later as the actions of a tyrant. His subsequent dealings with Clodius, akin to having Charlie Sheen run the Occupy Wall Street movement, just go to show that anyone's fortunes can be raised to sublime heights or come crashing down into the slime when enough people get an idea into their heads.

    As much as there is sickness in Rome as Terentia, Cicero's forthright wife, points out, so much of Cicero's situation rests on his shoulders. Strange to think how many times he had the opportunity to stab at Julius Caesar, and now he appears as a ghost haunting the would-be emperor in countless productions of Shakespeare's play. Harris does a remarkable job at ghost writing for Tiro, especially as he sets up the scenes in which Cicero's most famous speeches took place, and makes the words come to life.

    How many month will I have to wait for the third installment of the Cicero Trilogy, one that will no doubt shed some light on the abhorrence Cicero had for the enigmatic character of Mark Antony? The second in Robert Harris's trilogy about the life of famed Roman orator Cicero, this picks up almost immediately after the final events of Imperium.

    The story is once again narrated by Cicero's secretary Tiro, and opens with Cicero enjoying an elevated social and political status as consul. This book covers five years in his career, hence the title; 'lustrum' was a Roman term for a five-year period, and this one is particularly significant since it encompasses both the dazzling highs and the The second in Robert Harris's trilogy about the life of famed Roman orator Cicero, this picks up almost immediately after the final events of Imperium.

    This book covers five years in his career, hence the title; 'lustrum' was a Roman term for a five-year period, and this one is particularly significant since it encompasses both the dazzling highs and the dejected lows of Cicero's political career.

    Lustrum: (Cicero Trilogy 2) - Robert Harris - Google книги

    Meanwhile, Caesar - a relatively minor figure in Imperium - comes to the fore as Cicero's greatest foe, presenting a serious threat not only to his standing in society, but to his life. While still essentially based on fact, Lustrum is more dramatic, and feels more embellished, than its predecessor, which focused mainly on political machinations. For example, the book begins with the horribly mutilated body of a slave boy being pulled out of the Tiber, and this gruesome discovery is quickly followed by a charged face-off between Cicero and four senators, one of whom has been accused of murder.

    The pace picks up from there, in contrast to the relatively sedate affairs of Imperium , and the plot is a non-stop whirlwind of betrayal, conspiracies, death and lust - Tiro even gets a love interest in this one! I can't comment on how historically accurate it is, as I've deliberately avoided reading up on Cicero; this is the second in an unfinished trilogy, after all, and I don't want to spoil the next installment for myself.

    There certainly does seem to be more conjecture here - for example Tiro's aforementioned love interest, as well as a number of tasks he carries out independently on behalf of Cicero, which can't possibly have been documented. In this sense, it's perhaps closer to Harris's other fiction in nature, but I never felt the integrity of the story was being compromised. What really grabs me about these books is a how educational they are in their meticulous description of Roman politics and b how immersive they are, if I'm permitted to use that word to describe a book.

    Using the point of view of Tiro, who is ceaselessly loyal to Cicero, is a brilliantly effective device as it means you really root for Cicero's 'side' to triumph. Additionally, the Roman political system is so modern - both in its sophistication and its corruption - that it's difficult to believe how far back in history these events took place.

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    Since finishing Lustrum , I've really missed these characters and have found it difficult to read anything else. I know if the trilogy was already complete, I'd want to jump into the next book straight away, but I'll have to wait at least another year or so for that. Nevertheless, this is fast becoming one of the best series of books I've ever read. In an age of political titans, Cicero stands supreme: the senior consul of the Roman republic.

    But jealous rivals are determined to destroy him and seize control of the state. To thwart them will take all his guile - and will lead him, and Rome, to the brink of destruction. Robert Harris' "Lustrum" is a page-turning thriller that pitches the reader into the power struggles and vicious factionalism of the Roman Re The second book in the Cicero series read by Bill Wallis Blurb - The year is 63 BC.